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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 425 (some duplicates have been removed)
using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller buildings. engineering and
of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from
new technology making breast cancer detection more accurate and giving patients peace of mind. a two- time breast cancer survivor inter family turning her medical setbacks into an opportunity to help others. >> in tonight's medical watch taking radiologists eyes into deeper territory new technology boost two dimensional images into 3 d giving doctors a clearer view and patients more peace of mind. the traditional mammogram has been the gold standard because it's very good at detecting calcifications of the early stages of cancer. and can spot not jewels that a woman may not feel oneself exams, but still some patients pose a challenge to radiologists, and there is extra tissue a lesion could easily be hiding in there. like repairs this radiologist relies on conventional digital images which provide a simple projection at a single depth and now she is wearing in a new technology, three d sentencesdimensional tomo synthesis. in a single swoop on the arm of the machine captures not one but multiple pitcher's at varying depths next computer software stacks the images each in a 1 mm slice
the mayor came to us with a very precise question which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. this is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program at the brookings institution. he will be joined by a bunch of other panelists for how far can innovations take our cities. >> thanks. while they get ready, i
concentration in technology, we are offering the cheapest electricity in sunny areas compared to other systems. >> the award was presented to this solar entrepreneur as the industry faces tough times. a former prize winner's solar energy business is shedding around 1000 jobs. sma makes solar-technology components called power converters, essential into putting power into the grid. chinese composition and cuts to subsidies have hit his company hard. >> we need the government to support -- to provide support for german manufacturers. we need stronger funding for research and development, and we need an easy way to access funds. >> researchers agree. they are already experimenting with technology they say could bring even more light into their mini-panel, the kind of break through the company needs to compete. >> it time for a brief look at some of the other stories making news around the world. israel has launched three air strikes on gaza. the israeli military says it was targeting our rocket-launching site and militant base. the exchange of fire comes three days after both sides accepted an un
technology is dying out all together. as always with great change comes great opportunity. digital technology has the capity bri neorms of reading and new modes of publication. but to understand what the future of the book might look like t helps to appreciate some of its past. >> the manuscript library was built in 1963. its white all was ter shell has no windows this is to protect the treasures within. we're joined by david who is currently writing his own history of the book. >> books aren't going away. i mean i think and the question is what role they will play seems to me its thing that is hard toast pdict. one of the things that is really remarkable is as europe made the transition from world dominated by manuscript and manuscript proud the text that were bound into books, and by the end of the 15th century the print technology takes root. you find lots of people saying oh this print technology, it's very interesting. it's very efficient but everyone has access to everything, there are no controls. one doesn't really know if this thing has any real authority. the vocabulary in which an
's face it, the middle class was getting hammered, long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive but also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceos' salaries exploded and pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. and these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. we can't wish these and global competition wlsh here's what i know, wisconsin, we can meet that because we're americans, and we have the world's best workers and the world's best aupt paren irs. we have the best scientists and the best researchers, the best colleges and ooufrtsz, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy. in this new century and there's not a country in the earth that wouldn't change places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose ou
hammered long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive, but it also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceo salaries exploded. and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. in these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. can' away. but here's what i know, wisconsin. we can meet them. because we're americans. we've got the world's best workers and the best entrepreneurs. we've got the best scientists and the best researchers. the best colleges and universities, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy in this new century, and there's not a country on earth that wouldn't trade places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose our next president. and it's more than just a choice betwe
believe we have enough technology that we can prevent that to ever happen. of course, if they were a threat to america, we do have to take decisive action, we do have to show our might, and we have to make sure. but i don't want to get it to that point because, ladies and gentlemen, we have the technology. their bombs are not sophisticated enough, and they don't have it. we need to prevent them from getting that technology. we need to stop that immediately. but, of course, if our, if our sovereignty was ever threatened or our friends in the middle east, we need to go after them. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: much of what scott has said i agree with, we have to protect our friends in the middle east, and that certainly includes israel. i just want everybody to know how deeply i feel about protecting israel. but also doing well with moderate arab nations so that we can have a relationship over there. but let's face it, we simply cannot allow iran that is dedicated to to blitz ration of israel -- the obliteration of israel and others have a nuclear weapon. we're not going to let
. get headed in a new direction. with humira, remission is possible. that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. cc hey kev, how about a bike ride? you're not my dad ahh!! hey honey, back feels better, little dancing tonight, you and me? dr. scholl's pro inserts relieve different types of lower body pain by treating at the source so you're a whole new you. go pro with dr. scholl's. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multi-vitamin designed for men's health concern
percent. energy falling 1.7%. and technology down 1.5% falling commodity prices weighed on some of their respective stock sectors. oil fell more than two dollars per barrel, settling at its lowest price since june. the u.s. dollar was higher on the back of the employment numbers and a more expensive dollar can put downward pressure on oil. oil giant chevron also hurt the energy sector and the dow. chevron had the biggest percentage loss among dow stocks. chevron did not make as much money has anticipated in the third quarter. earnings per share were well short of estimates. similar to exxon mobil, chevron also saw its production and fuel sales fall, hit by hurricane isaac in august, legal troubles in braziand a refiry fire in california. shares fell 2.8%, closing at their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting its i
that technology was invented by somebody and it was invented by scientists that put together an idea and figured out how to make it work. >> that's true. we see innovation as the practical expression of imagination where you turn ideas into reality. and we're all about that here at the tech museum of innovation. >> what are some of the other exhibits? >> well, if you come to the tech museum you may want to get tickets to "mythbusters" an amazing exhibit. you can see the blueprints and if you get more wet whether you walk on run through the rain. you can play with react table where you move blocks around to may musical compositions and come down to our hands on on science workshop and build your own plane. >> that's one of the really neat things down here is not just sitting here in a class and learning about science but you get to do some real hands on stuff so you can understand how things work. >> it's true. you know, bay area science festival is all about unleashing your inyour scientists and tech museum. we want to help unleash your inner science. >> reporter: totally for geeks like me but i
information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani talking on taxes, health care, energy. he's introduced by tom donohue. >> if i could have your attention, pl
, the overweight banks energy real estate as well as information technology, they're pounding the tables here, but the question is, do better economic numbers mean that investors can go in and invest? >> i think that the classic ones, joy global, i think does make sense, i like the upgrade this morning. the caterpillar deeply inclined. china not coming back, maybe they're so concerned about caterpillar that they're saying it's not coming back that fast. >> we got adp stateside, jim, as well as the estimate. a big revision, they change d d. >> i thought the paychecks were two that really looked like numbers. and so i'm willing to say that this -- it makes so much more sense, but i keep trying to say what industry is doing the hiring in terms of construction. bigger size, small business, but construction yes, balanced against what i regard seeing is uncertainty in the banking industry, where they lay off, government sees more- >> we have ceos sit over here, what you're going to do with the money, or how many people you're going to hire, it's not tens of thousands, but it's something. and they'r
much" series. watch on c-span2. >> now a conference from detroit focusing on technology and entrepreneurship in u.s. urban areas throughout the country. it was a conference in mid september at wayne state university. this part of the conference's two hours. >> i'm going to turn it over to you. >> rock on. >> thank you for getting us started and thank you for being here. it is exciting to finally have this thing under way. we have been working on it for an awfully long time. what we do is up to now, a retreat-like invitation only leaders thing in the desert and we really wanted to get our message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there are some messages that are not sufficiently understood. i hope that is what you will be hearing throughout the day today. the messages at this event are focused on four issues -- u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth, which is tied to the first to, and the revival of our cities with detroit as a case study #one. we're very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great ci
? >> spotty. the technology we had internet service problems but the exchange has been unbelievable with their support. we were here early and they got us up and running. we're here as a physical presence. we're ready. >> you have hand helds. data feeds are working for hand helds. >> absolutely. that's one thing we nailed down to make sure we can get orders. the specialists are ready at the post ready to trade and open stocks a the 9:30. >> you have cell phones that you communicate with offices and sometimes when needed with clients. that's very spotty right now. two of the big downtown stations for verizon have been damaged. what are they doing to make sure that's working? >> they're working around the clock. they are going to try to get that open today. we have other ways to getting on this thing. creative ways down here, believe me. we can figure it out. >> neil, thank you very much. one of the things they have done here that's very creative is they have raised the threshold for the auto execution for the designated market makers. these are guys that used to be called specialist.
better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. >>> our second story "outfront," four days before the election, new cnn poll in what probably is going to be the most crucial swing state of all. we say probably. most people say definitely. 50 to 47% with the president ahead. within the margin of error. john king is in cincinnati tonight. john, another poll neck and neck, probably be a very long night on election night. what stood out in that poll to you? >> it is remarkable. if you look deep into the poll, the president might have a slight advantage, but this is a classic swing state and we have a dead heat. the president's getting the democrats. governor romney's getting the republicans so you want to
systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new completely re-imagined 2013 chevrolet malibu. sleek new styling... sophisticated dual cockpit design, and sport sculpted seats. available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu. ♪ refined comfort to get you in a malibu state of mind no matter what state you live in. ♪ >>> we're awaiting president obama in a swing state of ohio. meantime, in another swing state, that of virginia, bill clinton campaigning on behalf of the president. let's listen in at chesapeake, virginia, at indiana river high school. [ applause ] >> i don't know about you, but i'd rather you save the gasoline and export the oil if that's what we need to do. and that's why governor romney is having such a hard time breaking through in ohio. so what did he do? he ran -- he put -- he put a bogus ad on saying that for president had allowed j
'm p. making real things... for real. ...that make a real difference. ♪ we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. >>> and let's take a closer look right now in the race to 270 electoral votes. john king is here at the magic wall. on this day with three days to go, it's going to be complicate d. >> we know it's close and we have to say advantage to the president. but how big, that's the open question. we start the final weekend 237 strong or leaning the president's way. 206 leaning governor romney's way. the race of course is to 270. the president is ending withal rallies in iowa, wisconsin and ohio. why? because that's his eas
about the new tech knowledge offered at the -- technology offered at the center. the fda approved cutting edge technology is a first for our area and a giant leap forward for the former greater southeast community hospital. >> first of all, the radiation dose is half of the standard mammogram. and number two, the detector itself is twice, three times, more greater in density compared to standard mammogram technology. so that the image quality is superior to standard mammograms. >> reporter: microdose works using a foeton detector. that helps to produce a sharper more clear image of the breast. >> this actual piece moves across the breast. like a fan. and so every picture that every x-ray beam that comes out is perfectly focused from here to the breast tissue to the detector. >> reporter: while maintaining quality and accuracy, dr. tu says studies show cutting the radiation in half also lowers the small risk of radiation induced breast cancer. one less methodical concern for -- medical concern for his parents who come from d.c -- patients who come from d.c. wards 7 and 8 and boardi
years and years of technology -- liz: well traders were e-mailing me and said i'm upset, i wanted to go to work, i can handle this. >> it is one thing to be physically on the floor. the question is for a small investor and these markets are for the public too, by the way. the average investor that buys and sells stocks. you know, needs access to the markets. it makes no sense. this does not make sense. liz: on any other day you would never see what i'm about to show you and that is a shot of the big board at zero at 3:28 p.m. >> here's the thing, the big board's electronic station is located in chicago. liz: i know. >> its data system is in new jersey. the nasdaq has its system that's not -- i don't even know. i think it is in bethesda to be honest with you. liz: are you saying this is political? >> i don't know what it is. somebody screwed up here and this is a big thing. bond market is an over-the-counter market, maybe they are just -- who knows how it is not trading. i'm just telling you this that someone has to answer why the technology that -- why the brokers backed off on this, an
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. ♪ [applause] neil: whooping it up there tonight and why he has targeted florida, another one of the most when states. in most of the polls he is leading, not all of them. that's what makes him such a dicey guy, but he is selling the red meat to a group of very loyal partisans, but he does have a good shot at winning estate. ohio is looking more problematic certainly michigan. florida, they always talk about you have to win ohio, but an order to jump-start that you have to win florida. certainly more confidence in the sunshine state than at present they are in any other state. monitor what he's saying about the economy. help s
. but this election is different. today digital technology has given campaigns the ability to take that data and target voters with a precision never before possible. says aristotle ceo john phillips. >> we've been targeting voters for a long time, campaigns have been. what's different about it now? >> a couple of things that have changed. 2012 is a watershed year. what's changed is that the campaigns have found that by using powerful computers and sophisticated software that they are able to quickly sift through these mountains of data and slice and dice the electorate to break down that mass of voters to just the people you want to reach and talk to them about something that is relevant. the magic of the big data is the one-to-one targeting. >> reporter: how is the targeting a guy like me? i'm a ridgesterred independent in a battle ground state. >> it starts with the registered voter. the d.n.a. of the electorate. >> reporter: your name, address, gender, race. that's all in the registered voter file. it's available to the campaign. >> now on top of the registered voter file, there might be
that warning because, with today's technology and the skill we have, there is no reason to lose lives unnecessarily. >> speaking of today's technology, i think we can take a look at a picture from nasa, a picture speaks a thousand words and perhaps few images can define the magnitude of this monster storm than this one, snapped from the international space station. this is more than 900 miles wide, bearing winds of nearly 90 miles per hour. you know, jim, did you ever think you would have an opportunity to really be taking pictures of this massive phenomenon that would include, you know, massive snow amount, blizzard conditions in some ports of the -- parts of the country and fluting in others and high hurricane-force winds? >> caller: if we sat down and i showed you recorded notes and other photographs, having done this 21 years, there is a pattern. i have seen more storms, i have seen bigger storms and i can't tell you why, you but i have been shooting more pictures and brewing more people. i think we have entered a new age of weather. i hope this is the last sandy-type storm we eve
portable devices work seamlessly. >> using standard voice over technologies ill it allows you to hook radios into the infrom a structure. >> there are 300 volunteers going through specialized training. cisco won't say how much money is involved except to say lending a helping hand is priceless. >> breezy point neighborhood in queens new york almost burned down. howling winds blew flames from house to house. the fire storm destroyed at least 80 homes. it took 200 firefighters 12 hours to contain the blaze. no serious injuries were reported and no word on what caused this fire. >> snow continues to fall in west virginia. a floot footh reported in lower elevations. the blizzard left 250,000 people without power. many roads and highways are closed. one death from a storm snow is falling on the tennessee-north carolina border, as far as maryland. >> the storm keeping both presidential campaigns on the campaign trail. instead, former president clinton campaigned on mr. obama's behalf where' tacked mitt romney's position on climate change. >> he ridiculed the president for his efforts to fig
. >> tom: much more positive, much more constructionive. technology which had been a laggard, nasdaq, certainly knows this where you are at tonight t was one of the leaders today with the broad-based rally. let's get everybody updated with our market focus today. a new month, and new buying today with a broad-based stock gains. buyers got out early, with the s&p 50jumping from the opening bell on the back of optimism ahead of tomorrow's employment report. the gains held through the session with the index finishing up by 1%. trading volume today was 793 million shares on the big board; just under 1.9 billion on the nasdaq. the materials sector led the way higher, up 2%. the technology and industrials sectors came next, gaining 1.8% each today. u.s. steel was the top materials stock, building its rally thanks to suriserofit in its latest quarter. shares jumped 5.7%, even though the company forecasts break-even results in the current quarter. it's expecting to see lower prices and lower shipments for some types of steel. two other material companies-- gold miners barrick gold and newmon
and microsoft that used that technology. this technology helps ensure things like mobile phone antennas all work together. >>> the price tag for keeping the plant shut down climbed to $317 million. they spent $96 million on repairs and inspection and $221 to purchase replacement power. . >>> there is a hot line for residents of treasure island to call in response to concerns about a toxic clean up project. they set up the hot line after hearing complaints about uncovered work trucks driven on to the liland and there -- to the island. >>> for the second time in two days we are hearing from a shark attack survivor who says they were able to punch the shark away. he came face to face with a tiger shark last week. she says she made used of her tae kwon do and punched the shark twice. >> heard kind of like noise. people yelling, like hollywood, you know, you see the big jaws come at you. >> she needed 60-70 stitches for scratches. on tuesday a surfer survived a shark attack. >>> two tax measures that would benefit schools, prop 30 and 38. the governor says voters are facing a choice. approve the tax
-mail, the intersection of technology and privacy was paid long ago. back when the internet was known as the information superhighway. but now it seems the road is wide open, and wherever it leads, you're not only being watched, you're being photographed. >> it was very obvious that there was something different about that police car. >> reporter: mike had heard about the san leandro police department's license plate scanner. then one day he saw for himself the specially equipped car and began to wonder. he asked for public records and photos. >> i requested not just information about the cars that have been photographed by the license plate scanner, i also requested details about how many records they had gathered since the system started being used. >> reporter: to mike's surprise, over the encounters of two years, police had taken about 120 pictures of him and his car. an average of one a week. one clearly shows where he is. at home. but to mike, all of them show disturbly personal information. >> in at least one of those pictures, you can very clearly identify me getting out of the car with my two d
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 425 (some duplicates have been removed)